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Listed below are the "Subject" lines of some of the most frequently asked question.  To read the entire text, just click on the tiny Aero Cruiser to the left of each line.  At the bottom of each FAQ is another tiny Aero Cruiser to return you to the list.  Just click and cruise on through the the list. 
 
Click on the Click to Cruiseto go to its FAQ:
Click to Cruise Manuals, Documentation and Maintenance tips for an Aero Cruiser
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser / Amera Coach Hybrid
Click to Cruise How to use the Message "Search" function to get Help!
Click to Cruise Blue Book Value
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Insurance
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Derivability, Wandering and Towing
Click to Cruise Windshield Replacement
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Chassis, Front and Rear ends and Engine Year
Click to Cruise Trailer Hitch rating for the Aero Cruiser
Click to Cruise Has anybody put Dual Wheels on a 23 footer?
Click to Cruise Wood versus Metal Frame and how to tell which is which
Click to Cruise Exterior Measurements of the Aero Cruiser
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Headroom
Click to Cruise Drivers Seat Leg Room
Click to Cruise Where can I find a Used Aero Cruiser?
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Suspension and Tire size
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Vinyl Strip
Click to Cruise Aero Cruiser Pricing
Click to Cruise Passenger Capacity and Seat Belts

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-- Disclaimer --
Information on this Web Site is provided by members of the "Aero Cruiser Classics" Motor home Club. All information on this site is contributed by the club members or outside sources and is believed to be reliable; however, there is no warranty or guarantee that said information or advice is correct or free of defect. It is offered on a best effort basis and is to be used at your own risk.
 

FAQs:

Subject: Manuals, Documentation and Maintenance tips for an Aero Cruiser.

Question: I just purchased a Used Aero Cruiser and I don't have any documentation on anything! Help!!

Answer: Even if you did have the original documentation, it would not help much. It basically tells you what every owner's manual tells you -- check the oil and change it every so often. Both the 23 and 29 foot Aero Cruisers have a Chrysler 360 C.I.D. (5.9 Liter) engine from a D350, 1 ton Dodge truck with an A727 Transmission.  All of the front end, steering, wiring harness, computer, relays and dash equipment is supplied by the Industrial Engine division of Chrysler and comes from a full-size Dodge pick-up. Check the sticker on your air cleaner to find out what year the engine is. It is always a year or two older than the model year. For example my 1990 Aero Cruiser has a 1989 engine.

Everything in the front end is from a 1-ton Dodge Pickup that was extended 8 inches. It has coil springs and a lateral leaf stiffener-spring was added over the front axle. The rear suspension has leaf springs with airbags that are individually controlled from the front cab. The rear end is a Dana 60 by Spicer.

For wiring diagrams, engine repair, etc. go down to your local library and check out one of the Automotive repair manuals. The one I use covers Full-size Dodge Pick-ups from 1974 through 1993. It is by Hayden, ISBN 1 56392 202 9. There are other manuals available from other companies. If your library doesn't have one, check with the garage that services your rig. And the Internet is always there if you want to purchase one.   I picked a used one up on the Internet for $5.00 including shipping.  

For the equipment inside the motor home: Refrigerator, Stove, A/C, Heater, water system there are many books on the subject. Check at you local Camping World, a Motor Home repair center or on the Internet. If you are a Do-It-Yourself'er this is a must have.

We also have lots of knowledgeable owners in the club. Join our Club and get access to our News Letters with Tech-Tips and access to our Private Club site for members. Go to -- http://aero-cruiser.fl-ink.com/ -- for details.

Here are some general guidelines that I use on my 1990, 23 footer. This is for my Aero Cruiser only and may not be good for your rig.

Tire Pressure: Front 60 lb., Rear 75 lb. Check with your tire manufacture. The proper tire pressure depends on the tires you purchase and the weight on the Front and Rear axles. Note: if you over-inflate the front tires the unit may tend to wander on the highway and you may have a tendency to over steer. If you under-inflate, you will get poor tire wear and you may blow a tire.

Air Bags: 40 pounds each. (I have been told that the air bags are not part of the suspension, they are there to help with body sway especially in high winds.) Use too much pressure and you risk turn the rear-end into a catapult :-).

The 23 footer uses a Firestone Ride Rite air bag and compressor. It has 2 gages each with 2 push button air valves to increase or decrease the air pressure in the corresponding rear air bag. There is a compress (air pump) under the front hood that will come on when you turn the ignition on. It will fill a reservoir that is connected to the top push buttons that inflated the air bags. The bottom buttons simply bleeds of extra pressure when you push one of them.

The 29 footer uses a similar system from Granning Air Systems that automatically adjusted the air pressure in the air bags. It too has a compressor mounted up front. See the members tip list for maintains issues and parts for both systems.

Lug nuts: If you have Aluminum wheels it is imperative that you check the torque with a reliable torque wrench often. Check with the manufacturer of the wheels for the proper torque settings. Each manufacture is different and the torque is different for the different stud sizes used in the front and rear wheel drums. Aluminum wheels expand and contract more than steel wheels, and the lug nuts will loosen and you will lose a wheel if you don't check them often! If you over torque the lug-nuts you can damage Aluminum wheels. Steel wheels also need to be checked from time to time. 
Chrysler recommends 140 ft. lb. for all wheels.  See -- Aero Cruiser Lug Nut Torque Settings from Chrysler -- torque recommendations. 

Fuel Injection: Aero Cruisers from 1990 on use a throttle body carburetor with two Fuel Injectors, one for each manifold. The injectors tend to clog up if your rig sits for a long time. You can keep this from becoming a problem if you run the proper amount of fuel injector cleaner (see instruction on the product) through them after the motor home has set for a few months or longer, and you should always run the engine a minimum of 25 miles with the cleaner added to the gas just before you have it smogged.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser / Amera Coach Hybrid
 
Question:  I recently bought an Amera Coach.á Well it says that on the side but when I read your website and look at the pictures I believe the name is wrong.á Why I say this is my side door is not straight it has a bend in the middle.á It is a 29 footer and is a 1990 model.á The vin number is ___________LS0241.  Any info or insight would be great. CAV
 
Answer:  Maybe you or someone in your group may know of other Amera Coach like mine.  I have paperwork from the original owners that tell me that the unit is one of 6 29" Amera Coach's and the model is a hybrid. It has the sides of the Aero Cruiser but the roof, back cap, and front cap are Amera Coach. Interesting.  Anyway thank you for your responses and you invitation to join.á Finding this info out just makes me want to restore the unit and enjoy traveling. CAV 

Note:
There is also at lease one (and probably more) 1998 23' hybrid that I have had questions on.  I didn't know what they were until I received these e-mails from CAV.  If anybody else has more information then please let me know.   The Vin Number of an Aero Cruiser will end with ___________GP0xxx where GP stands for Gardner Pacific and xxx is the production number of the unit.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Blue Book Value
 
Tip:  The Aero Cruiser holds its value better than most coaches. According to Rick (the Club President), the Blue Book listing is under Sun Rader and does not include $17,000 or more worth of options.
 
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject: Aero Cruiser Insurance

Question: For Insurance purposes we would like to know what is the value of a 1990 - 23 foot Aero Cruiser?  Thank you, our best, Steve and Danielle

Answer: When you have a 17 year old rig, condition is everything. I have seen good ones sell in the 20K range. Basically you are talking about a restored antique. The important thing is what will the Insurance co. pay out if you total it.  If you want to insure it for more than you paid for it, you may need to get a written statement from the insurance company that they will cover it up to the value placed on it.  In this case they may require an inspection. Otherwise the agents 20K value they base your premium on may turn into the adjusters 1K pay out.

That said, I also have a 1990 23 footer with a standard insurance package. If I total it, all I expect is a fight from the insurance co.  My preference has been to go with an Insurance company that specializes in Motor Homes such as Good Sam or Camping World.  Their price was right and the package covered more motor home related items such as interior contents.  The packages change from time to time so check it out before putting bucks on the line. 

This is my personal opinion, you need to consult a lawyer for a definitive opinion.
Keep on Cruisin' -- Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser Derivability, Wandering and Towing

Question:  Can you tell me how the Aero Cruiser drives? Are they hard to control at 60 - 70 mph? Do they tend to wander around on the road at all? Is there any adverse changes when towing something? Thanks again, and I'll try to let you know. Hoping to be cruising soon, Mark

Answer:  The biggest derivability / wander-around-the-road factor is the tire pressure. I keep the Tire Pressure at: Front 60 lb., Rear 75 lb. Check with your tire manufacture. The proper tire pressure depends on the tires you purchase and the weight on the Front and Rear axles.  Note: if you over-inflate the front tires the unit may tend to wander on the highway and you may have a tendency to over steer. If you under-inflate, you will get poor tire wear and you may blow a tire.

When my wife and I first started driving the Aero Cruiser it took a while to get use to it.  We had a tendency to over correct but soon got use to it.  No problem after the first hour or so.  I don't drive it at 60-70 mph but my wife says it's no problem.

I tow a car from time to time without any problems. It will cost you about 1 mile per gallon in extra fuel burned.
Keep on Cruisin' -- Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Windshield Replacement

Question:  Where can I get a replacement windshield? Are they still being made?

Answer:  The windshields are still being made. Your insurance company will know of a distributor. There is also a "Link" on our private web site where you can get them.  It is -- http://www.coachglass.com/ -- but shop around, there may be other sources also.  I have replaced mine twice. In both cases my insurance covered it with a $100 deductible.
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser Chassis, Front and Rear ends and Engine Year

Question:  Where is the chassis number, I need it to get the right parts for the suspension. How can I find out what year the engine is?

Answer:  The Aero Cruiser a custom chassis so a chassis number will not help you find parts. The 1988-89 models had a "Vironex" chassis and some had steering or front suspension problems, so have the front end checked before you buy. The 1990-92 models had a better "LGS" chassis. 

Everything in the front end is from a Dodge full size pickup that was extended 8 inches and has a helper spring mounted above the axle. All of the electronics and the components in the dashboard are also from Dodge full size pickup. The rear end is a Dana 60 by Spicer. Read through the information on our web site -- http://aero-cruiser.fl-ink.com/ac-29ft.htm -- for more details.

Look on the engine air filter housing to get the year of the engine manufacture. The Aero Cruiser itself may be listed as a year or two newer then the engine. My 1990 Aero Cruiser has a 1987-8 engine.
Keep on Cruisin' -- Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Trailer Hitch rating for the Aero Cruiser
 
Tip:  The tag on my 1990 23 foot Aero Cruiser trailer hitch says it is rated to tow a maximum of 5000 pounds with a tongue weight not to exceed 500 pounds. That makes it a Class III hitch, welded to the frame and is good to tow a car or boat trailer.  If you are looking to haul a larger trailer you should use a "Weight Distribution Hitch" that transferees most of the tongue weight directly to the frame.  

The real question is how you drive with a trailer in tow and, for a heavy trailer, do you have a Gear Vender for steep terrain?  Basically you can haul almost anything with a low enough gear ratio.  Slow and steady is the name of the game.  In this case the rabbit is likely to burn out a transmission while the tortoise just keeps on truckin'.

Don't forget the brakes!  You need to connect the Aero Cruiser brakes to the trailer or car braking system in most cases.  Where you need gears to go you need brakes to slow! 

The following are general specification for trailer hitch and not specific to the Aero Cruiser.

  • Class I - up to 2,000 lbs of maximum gross trailer weight and 200 lbs of maximum tongue weight.  Are light duty hitches good for holding a bike rack or hauling a small utility trailer.   
  • Class II - up to 3,500 lbs of maximum gross trailer weight and 350 lbs of maximum tongue weight.  Good for small cars, SUV's and pickups.
  • Class III - up to 5,000 lbs of maximum gross trailer weight and 500 lbs of maximum tongue weight.  Good for mid-sized cars, SUV's and pickups.
  • Class IV - up to 12,000 lbs of maximum gross trailer weight and 600 lbs of maximum tongue weight or more when used with a Weight Distribution Hitch.  Good for full-sized cars, SUV's and pickups.
  • A "Weight Distribution Hitch" can be used to increase the Tongue Weight to: 600 lbs, 800 lbs, 1000 lbs or 1,200 lbs.  Check with the manufacture to see if you can use it on a motor home like the Aero Cruiser.  

Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald.
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Has anybody put Dual Wheels on a 23 footer?
 
Question:  We are in process of making this 89 coach our third motor home. Do you know of anyone who has put dual wheels on one of these?  If so what type wheel-set. I just feel a lot safer running duals on the rear, it seems like they would offer more stability. Would appreciate you answer and comments,  Looking forward to being a club member.  Thanks for you site and the info you provided. Again thanks, Sam
 
Answer:  Dual wheels are not added for stability, they are added for load.  Most motor homes with dual wheels are built on truck chassis.  They use 2 smaller tires instead of one larger tire to give a lower flat-bed for cargo carrying while supporting a given weight.  The result is a higher ground clearance.  The Aero Cruiser is designed as a low profile motor home with a much lower ground clearance and center of gravity.   It's tires are designed to support a  certain weight at a specific tire pressure. 

To know what the proper tire pressure is for each wheel, they should be weighed individually.  Then one can look up the proper inflation level in the manufacturer's tire chart based on the wheel supporting the most weight on a given axle.  Wheels on the same axel should always be inflated to the same pressure.  Over inflated tires cause a rough ride and lead to irregular and premature wear and the tires do not hold the road as well. 

On the Aero Cruiser most owners have found that 60 pounds in the front and 75 pounds in the rear work best for most tire manufacturers.  If you over-inflate the front tires your rig may tend to wander on the highway and you may have a tendency to over steer.  If you under-inflate, you will get poor tire wear and you may blow a tire. 

Other members have gone to a larger tire size that supports more weight and allows for a lower tire pressure giving a softer ride.  That's fine as long as you go by the book, the Tire manufacturer's book that is.  Be sure to check if your Aero Cruiser has large enough wheel wells to allow for larger tires.  Most Aero Cruisers don't! 
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald.

Update:  I agree but adding that the extra wheel in the rear is also a safety factor.  It is usually the rear wheel that catches road debris and goes flat or ruptures.  

On the other hand, duals would also require a modification of the wheel wells at the cost of interior space.  Also a dual-wheel rim hub has a 6in or more negative offset so the two rims can be mated together.  That means the front singles would do the same and you would have a 12" or more narrower track.  A front axel modification would also be needed.  Although spacers are available for that purpose, the bearings are not designed for that much camber stress.

So in the end, the question is "Why would anyone want to convert to duals"?
-=Dale=-
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Wood versus Metal Frame and how to tell which is which
 
Question:  Like your site!  Would you recommend staying away from purchasing a 1988 23' because of wood vs steel frame?
 
Answer:  Not really.  Wooden frames supporting the side walls and roof -- like the ribs found in the early Aero Cruisers -- are common in the industry today.  I don't know of anybody in the club who has had problems with either a wood or metal frame specifically.  The biggest potential problem is with leaks.  If you have a leak it should be fixed as soon as possible.   Wood frames and floors can get dry-rot while the metal frame will rust out.  In short, it's a toss up.  Many motor home and trailer manufactures use wood frames today.  The Aero Cruiser switched from the wooden ribs used in the "Vironex" chassis to the metal ribs found in the "LSG" chassis in 1990.  The "LSG" chassis are better in that they fix a number of front end weakness; however, if you don't have a front end problem then it doesn't matter.

Note:  The LSG Chasses will have a metal tag inside the front hood riveted to a vertical support on the left side (part of the frame) with LSG on top, the VIN number in the middle, and "Elkhart IN" on the bottom.   You can't miss it; it's easy to see.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject: Exterior Measurements of the Aero Cruiser
 
Question: I need to know how wide the exterior is for the 23 foot Aero Cruiser so I can see if I have enough room for it.
 
Answer: My 1990 23 foot Aero Cruiser (and I assume most others) measures 23' 3" bumper to bumper and is 7' 9" wide excluding the mirrors. The mirrors add 11" to 12" to each side depending on how they are adjusted. So the total width is 9' 9" or so. The height is 9' 4" to the top of the Air Conditioner unit on top of my rig. I always assume I will need 10 foot clearance when on the road. Everything except the length should be the same for the 29 footer.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald. 
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser Headroom

Question:  I was looking for the interior height from the floor to ceiling. I have always liked the style of these units & now looking at a few of the smaller motorhomes to purchase. Could you tell me what is the headroom in the 23 foot model? Thanks, Mark

Answer:  The ceilings are only 6'2". I am 6'1" and have no trouble: I probably duck
slightly for the air conditioner shroud but I don't think about it if I do.
My shower is a good 6'3" due to the dome. --Frank DeRemer

Update:  The ceilings are the same hight in the 23 and 29 foot Aero Cruisers.
Keep on Cruisin' -- Tom Heald

Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Drivers Seat Leg Room

Question:  I'm looking for a rear bedroom model Aero Cruiser. I just looked at one today but found that the driver's seat would not go back far enough to accommodate my 6'3" frame. Can you tell me if other tall owners have modified the driver's seat or perhaps the one I tried was unique?
Thanks, John

Answer:  The drivers seat should slide all the way back to the couch. If not then you have some sort of an obstruction. However, depending on the year, even then the foot room can be a bit tight. Some owners have replaced the seats. One option is to move the seat up. You can replace the pedestal it mounts on or just try a cushion on top of the seat. I am 6 foot and my wife is 5 foot 10, so I normally put a cushion on the seat to let me sit higher and give me a bit more leg room. When my wife drives, we take the cushion out and never have to adjust the seat back and forth.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Where can I find a Used Aero Cruiser?

Question:  I'm looking for a rear bedroom model Aero Cruiser.  Do you know of any on the west coast?

Answer:  There are always some used Aero Cruisers on the market. Check out the Public Web Page for the Aero Cruiser Club at: http://aero-cruiser.fl-ink.com/ac-sale.htm

A second source is on  -- http://aero-cruiser.fl-ink.com/  -- the club's public web site.  On the home page there are links to Classified Ad pages where some members and non-members advertise their uses Aero Cruisers.  Just scroll down the page to the section titled "Looking for Used Aero Cruisers" and follow the instructions. 

The site is to let non members know we exist and how to get in touch with us. This site also has lots of information about the Aero Cruiser including its history, photos, specifications and information on our club.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser Suspension and Tire size

Question:  I am thinking of buying one of these units and would appreciate a few answers. I would of course join your club if I find one. I was a member of the Cortez Club. I know the chassis is custom but what do they use for the front end (suspension)? Is there a problem with wheels and tires as they are single wheels? Is the rear axle coil or leaf sprung? Thanks

Answer:  Everything in the front end is from a 1-ton Dodge Pickup that was extended 8 inches. It has coil springs and a lateral leaf stiffener-spring was added over the front axle. The rear suspension has leaf springs with airbags that are individually controlled from the front cab.

I look at the single rear wheels as an advantage over the smaller dual-wheels. It all comes down to how much load each tire bears. I run 60 pounds of pressure in the front tires and 75 pounds in the rear which is the recommendation of the club's Techmaster. A common problem is over inflating the front tires which will cause the steering to wander around on the road a bit. A mechanic first guess will be the ball joints or the steering arms -- which could be true -- but before you open your wallet, check the tire pressure.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser Vinyl Strip

Question:  Hello: I am looking at a 1989 23' Aero Cruiser and am quite impressed. The main thing that bother me is the vinyl band that encompasses the unit at the joint of the two halves has some bubbling in spots, especially where the strip stops and starts. The bubbling is such that if it was a metal body, as in a car or truck, I'd be running for all I'm worth. I know that the two body halves have a metal band that they are attached to, and am wondering if this could be a problem? What is the metal band made of, could it be stainless steel? Could this be just bad glue holding the vinyl, or am I hoping for too much?
Mark

Answer:  The vinyl strip is a week point. Almost every coach has had to reapply the strip after 5 to 10 years. It is applied with double backed tape and water can get in at the seams. When I purchased my 1990 coach in 96 the vinyl was falling off. I removed everything, cleaned it up and reapplied it with contact cement. That was a mistake. I should have replaced it but I could not find a source at the time.  It lasted for another 5 years, but was badly discolored so I located the manufacture and replaced the old vinyl strip with a new one.

After replacing the vinyl strip I added a bead of clear silicon sealant above and below to keep the moisture out. That worked ok and I did the same thing when I replaced it later. I check it every spring and seal any area where the sealant is coming loose.  For more information on replacing the vinyl strip, look it up in out "Technical Data Base" if you decide to join our club at: http://aero-cruiser.fl-ink.com/

There are two types of Body Side Molding used on our rigs. The older models -- up through 1990 I think -- use a 4.75 inch wide molding on the sides and a 3.25 inch molding on the front and rear. Newer models use a thinner, bumper-style molding on the sides.

The best source for the wide molding is JC Whitney's "Ultra-wide Body Molding". It is 8.12 inches wide by 15 foot long. You trim it into strips approximately 4.75 & 3.25 inches wide for the sides and ends. You only need to order enough for the sides, as the part you trim off is more than enough for the front and rear. Go to -- http://www.jcwhitney.com/ -- and search for "ultra-wide molding" or call (800) 603-4383.

The metal band is aluminum and it allows the two haves to flex. I don't know of any coaches that have had a problem in this area. In the last year or two of production they switched to a different attachment method that replaced the 4.75 inch vinyl with a 1 inch (or so) "bumper" like strip to seal the attachment joint. This is a much better solution, but there is no way to retrofit the change.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Aero Cruiser Pricing

Question:  I am looking at a 1989 23' Aero Cruiser and am quite impressed. However, he is asking $22,000.00 US for the unit and it seems awfully high to me for a unit of this age and size. Is this within the range or out of line?
Mark 

Answer:  The price sounds about right, especially if everything  is ok with the coach.  As with any used vehicle, it's all in the condition and mileage.  A well maintained or restored coach with low mileage can sell for much more.  One that needs work, a lot less.

Because they are unique, and small they have held their price very well. Like "Yoda" said in "Star Wars". "Judge me not by my size." They sold new for around $50,000 and up. And that is real dollars of the time. If you adjust the price to Today's dollars, well, you can do the math.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.

Subject:  Passenger Capacity and Seat Belts

Question:  I am looking at purchasing a '89 - 23' with capacity for only two people. It has only two seat belts, and they are in the cab area. It has the two free standing chairs for a dinette area, and no way of belting anyone in there. We are moving into retirement and the kids are now on there own. This will be my first motorhome. My questions and concerns are: How much of a concern is it to be able to carry passengers? Do other Areo Cruiser owners have this situation and is it a concern for them? Thank you

Answer:  A standard Aero Cruiser has seat belts for 5 or 6.  Each of the seats has a belt, 3 in the Rear Bed and Rear Bath models and 2 in the Twin Bed model.  There are also 3 other seat belts for the couch or dinette.  Check the Floor Plans on our public web site.  It sounds like the one you are looking at has been modified or the missing belts are tucked below the seats. Ask the owner.
Keep on Cruisin', Tom Heald
Click to CruiseReturn to the Tip List.


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